Sunday, June 22, 2014

10 Unique Painting Ideas for Boys

My boys love to paint and are even more excited when that painting doesn't involve paint brushes.   I've heard from many of my friends with boys that their kids don't like to sit for painting, so I've compiled some unique painting methods to intrigue the reluctant Picassos in your life!  Yes, ALL of these ideas are also great for girls, but since I've tried them with boys, I can definitely attest to the fact that every single boy I've tried them with has loved them!  They love the noise, the mess, and the novelty of using something besides traditional paintbrushes for their art!
10 Unique Painting Ideas for Boys - Mamas Like Me


1.  Coffee Can Marble Painting - Crayon Box Chronicles
2.  Yarn Line Painting - Crayon Box Chronicles
3.  Melting Insect Painting - Crayon Box Chronicles
4.  Bouncy Ball Art - Crayon Box Chronicles
5.  Track Painting - Crayon Box Chronicles
6.  Bubble Wrap Painting - Crayon Box Chronicles
7.  Cookie Cutter Painting - Crayon Box Chronicles
8.  Dinosaur Painting - Mamas Like Me
9.  Ice Pop Painting - Mamas Like Me
10.  Cotton Ball Painting - Mamas Like Me

 Want more ideas for spending time with your kids?  Be sure to follow us on our Facebook or Pinterest pages and sign up for emails to keep up with all the latest crafts, activities, and kid-friendly recipes!

 photo HopforHope_zpsdaacc16f.jpg 

You may have also noticed that most of these ideas come from my dear friend Heather at Crayon Box Chronicles.  This post is part of the Hop for Hope to support Heather and her sweet baby Savannah Hope.  The following is the story of Savannah's fight to survive taken directly from her support page:

Savannah Hope is in need of your love, support, and prayers. She is currently fighting for her life at the NICU at University of California San Francisco.  She was born with a life threatening birth defect called Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia (CDH).  Her mother, Heather, has undergone complicated in utero tracheal occlusion surgery at 29 weeks to try to give Savannah a better chance at survival.  Sadly, the surgery was unsuccessful in improving her lung growth.  With just a 30% chance of survival, she has a long and hard fight to become stable enough to undergo surgery to move her organs back and repair the defect.

Her Condition
Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia (CDH) is a birth defect of the diaphragm. Essentially with CDH there is a hole in the diaphragm that allows organs from the diaphragm to move into the chest and thereby compromising critical lung development.  CDH affects about one in every 2,500 live births per year.
Savannah has severe left CDH with less than 10-15% lung tissue. She is also ‘liver-up’ meaning her liver and contents of her abdomen are in her chest putting extensive pressure on her heart and underdeveloped lungs.  As expected, she has pulmonary hypertension as well.  Savannah was diagnosed at 19 weeks during a routine ultrasound and genetics counseling session for down syndrome.
Baby Savannah is truly a fighter, having survived complicated tracheal occlusion surgery while in utero.  Only just a few days after her birth on June 10th, she had her CDH repair surgery to move her displaced organs.
On June 14th the doctors at UCSF decided that sweet baby Savannah had to go on ECMO (full life support). Her tiny little lungs are just not strong enough to function properly at this point.  She is resting her lungs for 7-10 days and will be taken off life support to see if she can cross this hurdle to recovery.

She has a long fight ahead of her and we want to do everything we can to support her and her amazing parents, Heather & Nick and 4 yr old brother, Cayden.
Donations
All donations will cover Savannah's medical and family expenses for treatment including:

- CDH repair surgery & tracheal occlusion surgery
- ECMO
- treatment (ventilators, oxygen, medications, blood transfusions)
- hospitalization
- family travel (food, gas, parking, tolls)
In addition, donations will help cover the incalculable costs this beautiful family will endure in the months and years ahead. Your support, in any amount, will be most appreciated by the Johansen family.
- See more at: http://www.youcaring.com/medical-fundraiser/prayers-for-savannah-hope-fund/149231#sthash.zzrrOHhm.dpuf
Savannah Hope is in need of your love, support, and prayers. She is currently fighting for her life at the NICU at University of California San Francisco.  She was born with a life threatening birth defect called Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia (CDH).  Her mother, Heather, has undergone complicated in utero tracheal occlusion surgery at 29 weeks to try to give Savannah a better chance at survival.  Sadly, the surgery was unsuccessful in improving her lung growth.  With just a 30% chance of survival, she has a long and hard fight to become stable enough to undergo surgery to move her organs back and repair the defect. - See more at: http://www.youcaring.com/medical-fundraiser/prayers-for-savannah-hope-fund/149231#sthash.zzrrOHhm.dpuf
Savannah Hope is in need of your love, support, and prayers. She is currently fighting for her life at the NICU at University of California San Francisco.  She was born with a life threatening birth defect called Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia (CDH).  Her mother, Heather, has undergone complicated in utero tracheal occlusion surgery at 29 weeks to try to give Savannah a better chance at survival.  Sadly, the surgery was unsuccessful in improving her lung growth.  With just a 30% chance of survival, she has a long and hard fight to become stable enough to undergo surgery to move her organs back and repair the defect. 
Her Condition
Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia (CDH) is a birth defect of the diaphragm. Essentially with CDH there is a hole in the diaphragm that allows organs from the diaphragm to move into the chest and thereby compromising critical lung development.  CDH affects about one in every 2,500 live births per year. 
Savannah has severe left CDH with less than 10-15% lung tissue. She is also ‘liver-up’ meaning her liver and contents of her abdomen are in her chest putting extensive pressure on her heart and underdeveloped lungs.  As expected, she has pulmonary hypertension as well.  Savannah was diagnosed at 19 weeks during a routine ultrasound and genetics counseling session for down syndrome.
Baby Savannah is truly a fighter, having survived complicated tracheal occlusion surgery while in utero.  Only just a few days after her birth on June 10th, she had her CDH repair surgery to move her displaced organs.
On June 14th the doctors at UCSF decided that sweet baby Savannah had to go on ECMO (full life support). Her tiny little lungs are just not strong enough to function properly at this point.  She is resting her lungs for 7-10 days and will be taken off life support to see if she can cross this hurdle to recovery.

All donations will cover Savannah's medical and family expenses for treatment including:

- CDH repair surgery & tracheal occlusion surgery
- ECMO
- treatment (ventilators, oxygen, medications, blood transfusions)
- hospitalization
- family travel (food, gas, parking, tolls)
In addition, donations will help cover the incalculable costs this beautiful family will endure in the months and years ahead. Your support, in any amount, will be most appreciated by the Johansen family.
You can follow along with Heather and Savannah's journey on their Facebook page and donations can be made through the Prayers for Savannah Hope Fund

We are so thankful for everyone's prayers, positive thoughts, and well-wishes for this sweet family! 
Savannah Hope is in need of your love, support, and prayers. She is currently fighting for her life at the NICU at University of California San Francisco.  She was born with a life threatening birth defect called Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia (CDH).  Her mother, Heather, has undergone complicated in utero tracheal occlusion surgery at 29 weeks to try to give Savannah a better chance at survival.  Sadly, the surgery was unsuccessful in improving her lung growth.  With just a 30% chance of survival, she has a long and hard fight to become stable enough to undergo surgery to move her organs back and repair the defect.

Her Condition
Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia (CDH) is a birth defect of the diaphragm. Essentially with CDH there is a hole in the diaphragm that allows organs from the diaphragm to move into the chest and thereby compromising critical lung development.  CDH affects about one in every 2,500 live births per year.
Savannah has severe left CDH with less than 10-15% lung tissue. She is also ‘liver-up’ meaning her liver and contents of her abdomen are in her chest putting extensive pressure on her heart and underdeveloped lungs.  As expected, she has pulmonary hypertension as well.  Savannah was diagnosed at 19 weeks during a routine ultrasound and genetics counseling session for down syndrome.
Baby Savannah is truly a fighter, having survived complicated tracheal occlusion surgery while in utero.  Only just a few days after her birth on June 10th, she had her CDH repair surgery to move her displaced organs.
On June 14th the doctors at UCSF decided that sweet baby Savannah had to go on ECMO (full life support). Her tiny little lungs are just not strong enough to function properly at this point.  She is resting her lungs for 7-10 days and will be taken off life support to see if she can cross this hurdle to recovery.

She has a long fight ahead of her and we want to do everything we can to support her and her amazing parents, Heather & Nick and 4 yr old brother, Cayden.
Donations
All donations will cover Savannah's medical and family expenses for treatment including:

- CDH repair surgery & tracheal occlusion surgery
- ECMO
- treatment (ventilators, oxygen, medications, blood transfusions)
- hospitalization
- family travel (food, gas, parking, tolls)
In addition, donations will help cover the incalculable costs this beautiful family will endure in the months and years ahead. Your support, in any amount, will be most appreciated by the Johansen family.
- See more at: http://www.youcaring.com/medical-fundraiser/prayers-for-savannah-hope-fund/149231#sthash.zzrrOHhm.dpuf


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